warmblood studbook uk stallion horse breeders

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS REGARDING REGISTRATION

Keeping an equine: click to read more.....

Important Defra Rules Pertaining to Horse Registrations and Ownership etc. click to read more....

Hwarmblood studbook uk stallion horse breedersorse Passports Regulations click to read more.....

 

Q. Why use the WBS-UK instead of another stud book?

A. With nearly thirty years of serious application of International Breeding rules in the UK Warmblood Horse population, the WBS-UK sets out to be a “quality not quantity” studbook with rigorous paperwork. We are convinced in our insistence on International Judges presiding over all our National Grading for both Mares and Stallions and we will only issue the highest level of documentation – the pink papers – to those animals where both parents are fully graded with our society. At the same time we are a Studbook that is open to all animals from other foreign WBFSH members. This enable the true development of British Breeding with access to the best lines in Europe, whether they be German, Dutch, Danish, French, Swedish or from any other Warm Blood Studbook.

Q. What is the benefit of registering my foal?

A. Apart from the statutory requirement for every horse to obtain and be accompanied by a passport and it being illegal to sell a horse without one, registration of your foal ensures that the pedigree is validated and recorded and that you, as the breeder are recognized. These days, the purchaser of a quality foal at a good market price will expect to see the same “quality” in the accompanying breeding documents. A further benefit of registration lies with the developing National Equine Database which will allow you, in future, to track the performance of your registered animal

Q. How do I register my foal?

A. If you owned the dam of your foal at the time of covering, you will have been issued with a covering certificate by the stallion keeper or stallion owner. If this was a BWBS/WBS-UK certificate it will have required the full identification of your mare (the dam) and will have been completed with the identity of the stallion and its BWBS/WBS-UK stallion number. On the reverse of this form is a pro forma for your vet to complete to show the markings of the foal. This must be completed prior to weaning. On the front of the form is the box which allows you to choose a name for your foal – first and second choices in case your first choice is already taken. Please remember that the name of your foal must begin with the same first letter as that of his sire. Please make sure that you know the difference between the stallion’s actual name and his prefix. Should you wish to add your breeder’s prefix to the foal then you must apply to register this with the Central Prefix Register. This will be arranged for you by the BWBS/WBS-UK registration office.

If your mare is covered by a stallion not registered in the WBS-UK studbook, we accept valid covering certificates from other UK and Foreign societies. You must obtain a registration form for your foal which must be completed by a vet, as above, and should be sent to the registration office with the covering certificate with which you were issued. This may be a certificate of insemination from a vet or an AI centre for imported semen..

If you bought the mare in foal, you must ensure that you have received one or other of the above certificates to enable the registration of your foal and the identification of its dam. The person who owned the mare at the time of covering will be classed as the breeder.

Q. Can I register a foal with a covering certificate from a different stud book?

A. Yes, you may provided that it is a recognized studbood.

Q. Do I have to be a member to register a foal?

A. Yes, you do and membership will be provided for the calendar year of registration for an additional £20. You will then need to renew on 1st January of the following year and then most of your subsequent transactions with the society cost a little less for you as a member.

Q. What is the benefit of grading my mare?

A. As mentioned previously, present day breeders are dealing with a very discerning market where the customer, increasingly, understands the process of breeding and grading. The Grading of your mare allows the purchaser of her foals to know that the mare has met a quality standard in her type, conformation and paces. This is particularly important if you are selling an older horse that you have bred when, for one reason or another, the mare cannot be seen. This “Quality Mark” should support the value of both your mare and her offspring. Further, the stock that you breed from her will be eligible for those cherished “pink papers” provided that you have used a graded and recognized stallion. Breeding is an exciting but expensive business and to get the top prices for your production you need the best accreditation.

Q. My mare has papers from another society, is she eligible for grading with you?

A. Most mares are eligible for grading with the WBS-UK into one or other of our books. The criteria to be satisfied are, for the Slelect or Main Warmblood Studbook, the mare must have at least 50% warmblood pedigree and for the Sports Horse Register, she must have at least 25%. Sometimes, only part of her pedigree will be validated and in this case each mare is considered separately. The exception to the above rule is Thoroughbred (ie General Studbook) mares who are eligible for the Main Warmblood Studbook.

Q. Do you automatically accept mares graded with another stud book, and if yes which stud books?

A. In general, we do not accept breeding mares from other studbooks without their grading with us. This is consistent with the policies of the majority of Studbooks. The exception to this rule is those top percentile mares that are graded Ster, Pref, State Premium, Elite etc in other European Studbooks who are likely to be eligible to transfer straight into our Select Studbook after overstamping. Because of the judging standards that we share with some of our UK sister societies, we also accept UK Elite BHHS and Trakehner mares into our Main Studbook without further grading. Should they wish to achieve Select status as they have achieved with their society of initial registration, they must come forward to us for grading.

Q. Why would I performance test my mare?

A. If you have made a substantial investment in your breeding mare then you may wish to obtain as many good foals as possible while the mare is young and therefore not wish to embark on a ridden career. In this case you are missing that vital ingredient in the future marketing of her offspring as her movement or jumping under saddle and her rideability have no measure or proof. The Mare Performance Test solves this problem and, while it is designed not to overface the young three or four year old mare, it is sufficiently rigorous to show the talent and attitude of your mare. We believe that the indicators for a mare achieving First Star status equate well with the early stages of affiliated competition in either dressage, jumping or eventing.

Q. What is the benefit of grading my stallion?

A. As with the other questions about grading and testing it is clear that we are in an increasingly discerning market and we must compete, and are able increasingly to compete, on a level playing field with the longer established continental warm blood studbooks. This means adopting the same standards of assessment as our colleagues, even if our methodologies have to be a little different because of our shortage of indoor schools, good riders, trainers, etc. Grading your stallion is part of this process and will allow him to be “competitive” as a breeding animal with his type, conformation, paces and jumping ability enabling him to step onto the first rung of BWBS Stallion Grading. You may wish to follow this initial grading with ridden competition or even a performance test of 30 or 70 days or your next step may be to present a progeny group. Either way your will be doing your best to ensure that your stallion has the best breeding credentials from a society that values pedigree, performance and correctness. Once again there is the question of the discerning market, and a stallion without graded status is unlikely to attract the best mares and will therefore have little chance to produce the best offspring.

Q. Is my colt good enough to make a stallion?

A. This is always difficult to answer until the colt has begun preparation for the performance test, and it is often difficult to benchmark a colt when he is considered in isolation. It is easier to say when a colt is not good enough on the grounds of correctness. It does not require an expert eye to see whether limbs are straight, feet equal etc. At the WBS-UK we now offer an assessment class for yearlings. The fee is £50 and enables the owner to present a yearling or two year old to the same quality of judges who would preside over a stallion grading. Their comments may or may not be conclusive, but their indication is helpful.

Q. When do you grade the stallions and at what age?

A. We would recommend that colts/stallions are brought forward in the autumn of their second or third year. We do, however, accept older stallions for grading.

Q. Do you automatically accept stallions graded with another stud book, and if yes which stud books?

A. No. There may be occasional “ Special Invitation”Stallions, but in general all stallions have to come forward for grading or, if they meet certain criteria of performance or offspring and are graded with another recognized studbook, they may come forward for “Inspection”.

Q. What’s the difference between a WBS stallion and a BSHR stallion?

A. Our Grading standards apply equally to our British Sports Horse Register where the only difference is the percentage of Warmblood (ie 25% rather than 50%) or perhaps some missing parentage. The BSHR stallion has to meet the same level of scoring in the grading and should in no way be regarded as a second class citizen. In many cases this is a stallion with a heritage pedigree and with performance parentage from a time when we in the UK did not understand the value of Studbooks outside of the GSB. We must cherish these stallions for their sporting credentials even if sometimes we are not able to prove all their ancestry. 

 

Important Defra Rules Pertaining to Horse Registrations and Ownership etc.

No passport may be issued unless all sections of the application form are complete and all relevant information has been provided 

Where a passport application is received outside the statutory time limit the organisation involved must immediately sign Section IX Part II of the passport to declare the animal as not intended for human consumption. This time limit is within 6 months of birth or before the 31st of December of the year of birth, whichever date occurs later. 

Appropriate checks must be made to ensure that a passport does not already exist for a particular equine before a new passport is issued. This must include checking the existing records held by the organisation by transponder number. Where it is claimed that an equine is of a specific breed, and the passport application deadlines in paragraph 3.4.5 of this document have been exceeded, enquiries must be made with organisations for that breed. 

For rescued equines it is accepted that information on the existence of a passport as required in paragraph 3.4.6 of this document may not be available. Where the organisation is satisfied that the equine was genuinely rescued, a passport may still be issued so long as it is signed by the organisation in Section IX part II to declare the animal as not for human consumption   

Organisations must make all reasonable checks to verify the accuracy and authenticity of information  provided on passport applications. 

Where a passport application is received outside the statutory time limit the organisation involved must immediately sign Section IX Part II of the passport to declare the animal as not intended for human consumption. This time limit is within 6 months of birth or before the 31st of December of the year of birth, whichever date occurs later. 

Appropriate checks must be made to ensure that a passport does not already exist for a particular equine before a new passport is issued. This must include checking the existing records held by the organisation by transponder number. Where it is claimed that an equine is of a specific breed, and the passport application deadlines in paragraph 3.4.5 of this document have been exceeded, enquiries must be made with organisations for that breed. 

For rescued equines it is accepted that information on the existence of a passport as required in paragraph 3.4.6 of this document may not be available. Where the organisation is satisfied that the equine was genuinely rescued, a passport may still be issued so long as it is signed by the organisation in Section IX part II to declare the animal as not for human consumption. 

Organisations must make all reasonable checks to verify the accuracy and authenticity of information provided on passport applications. 

It is the organisation’s responsibility to make reasonable checks to ensure that any transponder number and silhouette provided in an application is completed correctly, legibly and by a person with appropriate authority as defined under the legislation listed in section 3.12. The organisation can check whether that person is registered with the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons using their database.

Upon identification, the organisation is obliged to issue an equine with a Unique Equine Life Number in accordance with instructions in Annex 1 of this document. 

Where a new Section IX is added to an old passport, the organisation must sign and stamp Part II to declare the equine as not intended for human consumption. 

Owners should note that if an equine’s permanent passport is not immediately available to a veterinary surgeon, medicine that would exclude that horse from the food chain cannot be administered. 

Owners should note that equidae may not be moved between countries or to slaughter on a temporary document. 

Duplicates and replacements for lost passports  

3.8.1 Before issuing a duplicate or replacement passport, organisations must take reasonable steps to satisfy themselves that the original passport is indeed lost. Steps might include requiring the applicant to sign a declaration to that effect, or raising queries where an equine has had multiple duplicate passports.

3.8.2 Replacement passports are intended for equines whose identity cannot be established. Because of this, a vet will need to complete an entirely new identification before a replacement passport can be issued.

3.8.3 Before they are issued, all replacement and duplicate passports must be signed and stamped (in Section IX Part II) by the organisation to declare the equine as not intended for human consumption. This includes passports issued to replace those without a Section IX. Failure to stamp such a passport is an offence under the horse passport regulations.

3.8.4. Organisations must stamp the front page, silhouette and Section IX of any duplicate or replacement passport as “duplicate” or “replacement” prior to its issue. Failure to mark such a passport as duplicate or replacement is an offence under the horse passport regulations.

In all cases where a passport is updated or issued for an equine whose original transponder cannot be located, the passport must be signed and stamped (in Section IX Part II) by the organisation to declare the equine as not intended for human consumption.

3.11.1 When an organisation is notified of the death of one of the equines on its database, this notification must be recorded on that database.

3.11.2 Upon receipt of the passport of a deceased or slaughtered equine the organisation must check the passport for consistency with existing records and other signs of fraud as outlined in section 5. The passport must then be invalidated by clearly tamper proof stamping it as “invalid” on every page or punching a hole of appropriate diameter through the top right hand corner of every page.

3.11.3 The passports of deceased or slaughtered animals may be returned to the equine’s owner or keeper on request following invalidation. A detailed record must be kept of all such passports as described in section 2.3 (iii) of this document.

Horse Passports Regulations 2009

Legal Responsibilities for Owners:

The owner of an equine (horse, pony or donkey) has specific legal responsibilities under the Horse Passport Regulations 2009. Failure to comply may mean that the local authority (usually Trading Standards) takes enforcement action. The maximum penalty for each offence is £5000.00

The responsibilities an owner (or main keeper) must comply with are outlined below:

Applying for a Passport:

It is an offence not to have a veterinarian microchip a foal prior to applying for a passport and It is an offence to apply for a passport from an authorised Passport Issuing Organisation (PIO) after the equine is 6 months old or after the 31st of December of the year of birth whichever is the later.

Keeping an equine:

A Trading Standards or Animal Health Officer may request a passport to be produced for inspection. Failure to present a passport for inspection is an offence

The passport should accompany the animal when it moves to shows, sales, competitions and when it is sold or goes to slaughter. Failure to do so is an offence.

Note the number & the PIO it was issued by. This makes obtaining a replacement more straightforward if the original is ever damaged or lost as the passport is valid for the life of the horse.

It is an offence to apply for a duplicate passport for an equine unless the original is lost or destroyed..

When a vet medicates or injects a horse, pony or donkey it must be recorded in the Administration of Veterinary Medicinal Products section of the passport if the equine has not been signed out of the human food chain.

In addition in the Administration of Veterinary Medicinal Products section, an equine can be signed out of the food chain by an owner or keeper and veterinarian.

If an equine dies or has to be put to sleep then the passport must be returned to the issuing PIO within 30 days to have it invalidated. Failure to do so is an offence.

It is an offence to obstruct an inspector who is enforcing the Horse Passport Regulations 2009

Selling an equine:

When a horse, pony or donkey is sold the passport must be passed onto the new owner. Failure to do so is an offence.

Buying an equine:

When a horse, pony or donkey is purchased always obtain the passport & notify the PIO within 30days of the new owner. Failure to do so is an offence.